first_imgIs Oklahoma State the quietest top 10 in the history of college football? Could be. Its players think so anyway.“I’ve been feeling like we’ve been getting slept on,” Devante Averette told the O’Colly. “But eventually, they’re going to wake up. I feel like we’re a great team. I always feel like we don’t get as much credit as we should, but we fixing to prove that. But either way it goes, if we get the W, that’s it for us. We don’t care about anything else.”OSU now has the fifth-longest streak in the country even though they’re rarely mentioned among the top dogs of the sport this season. I get that, I suppose. What is OSU’s best win? At West Virginia? At Texas? Are those teams any good? Even though the perception nationally is that they aren’t, road wins in the Big 12 are tough to come by.AdChoices广告If OSU can somehow get by Texas Tech in Lubbock this weekend, it’s all systems go for November.[1. We play at Iowa State in November, I realize it. I’m trying very hard to ignore it.]That quote from Averette, by the way, wasn’t even his best of the last week. Look at what he said after the game on Saturday about his interception.“All I could think was score. I always tell my teammates if I get my hands on it, I’m going to score. It’s the second game in a row, first West Virginia and now Kansas. It sickens me that I didn’t score.” While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. There are a lot of numbers to choose from, but I tried to narrow it down to just eight. Here we go.1. Most points ever in LubbockHow about that? Ramon Richards notched the record. The 70 Oklahoma State posted on Saturday is the most that have ever been scored on Tech in Lubbock. More than the 2011 team which *only put up 66.That’s also the most points ever scored in a conference game by the Pokes.2. James Washington is sixth WR to post 200-yard dayAdChoices广告Dez Bryant (2x), Justin Blackmon (2x), Rashaun Woods (3x), Adarius Bowman, Curtis Mayfield and now Washington. Pretty special list.3. How rare is a 70+ to 50+ game?It’s only happened five other times since 2000 and just once between Power 5 schools. Unsurprisingly, this came in a Big 12 game between West Virginia and Baylor.Update: I can’t read. It happened twice. Arkansas-Kentucky too. Still, wild. Screen Shot 2015-10-31 at 10.15.25 PM4. How about 1,304 yards?This was just the 21st game since 2000 in which both teams had 640 or more yards. OSU and Tech were also involved in one of the other ones (2003)5. Second-biggest comeback everOSU revived itself from 17 down in the second quarter. That’s the second-biggest comeback in school history.6. Just because this is hilariousJ.W. Walsh put up 218 yards by himself in the 4th quarter today on a total of 4 rushes + 2 passes.— Max Olson (@max_olson) November 1, 2015Over 200 yards on six plays? That was like two weeks’ worth of Mike Yurcich work earlier on this season.7. Seven in a row vs. RaidersThis is hard to believe, but Oklahoma State has won seven straight against Texas Tech (hasn’t lost since Zac was the QB in 2008!) and has posted 188 points in its last three trips to Lubbock. 188!8. Mason Rudolph had fourth-best QBROSU QBs ranked by QBR on Saturday …Austin Hays: 100 (perfect)J.W. Walsh: 99.7Chris Carson: 99.5Mason Rudolph: 56.8Speaking of Hays, he’s the first O-Stater since (at least 1982) to have a passing and receiving TD in the same game (according to OSU’s athletic dept.)last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Time to dance.The Big 12’s November mini-playoff has been well-documented over the last week. TCU, Baylor, OU and the Pokes for the 2015 Big 12 title. It should be electric. It might be the best end-of-season race in conference history.College football is of course almost never not exciting. Look at last year. OSU was an abomination at this point in the season. You could argue that it ended in the most exciting way an OSU season has ever ended. That’s the beauty of rivalries and conference title spoilers. That’s the beauty of college football’s regular season.What isn’t always present, however, is the lingering “what if … ” questions. Those are usually quelled by mid-October or, sometimes, the end of September. All 128 teams start out the end of August saying “what if … ?” Very few get to play the game in November.AdChoices广告At the beginning of every season, my friends and I always play a high-spirited contest of “what if … ?” We try our darndest to top one another. This usually evolves from “what if OSU blows out to Central Michigan?” to “what if OSU is down six to OU on Thanksgiving weekend with an 11-0 season on the line and Mason Rudolph has the ball on his own 10 with 90 seconds left?” There are a lot of scenarios between those two.It’s a fun game but it’s almost never more fun than it is at the beginning of the regular season. Teams are error-free. Nobody has lost. It’s light-hearted and tremendous. It’s why we like new beginnings.This year is different. This year, Mike Gundy’s squad has quietly and solidly been improving every single week. It’s something Gundy has talked about all year. “Play your best football at the end of the season.” OSU is doing so right now.Which means the “what ifs” have continued yet another week as October bleeds into college football’s very best month.What ifs like, “what if Trevone Boykin loses for the third time in Boone Pickens Stadium in his career?” and “what if Art Briles remains winless in Stillwater?” and “what if OU loses to Baylor and Oklahoma State wins its next three games and has the Big 12 title sewn up before Bedlam?” and finally, “what if Bedlam is to get the No. 1 seed in the College Football Playoff?”This is what you dream of as a college football fan. This is as good as the sport gets. Games are exciting for different reasons (again, see Bedlam 2014) but the “what if” games are the very best games.But these aren’t even the biggest “what if” questions of this month. A month when the weather turns bitter but the football remains sweet. A month when the Cowboy faithful fill Boone’s house to the brim and try to will their undermatched team to its second conference crown in the last five years.A month when Mason Rudolph and J.W. Walsh have a chance to become this year’s Cardale Jones and J.T. Barrett (minus the “I word”). A month when you can rank Big 12 teams as low as you want in the College Football Playoff rankings, but you can’t ignore 12-0.No, the biggest question of November has suddenly become what if “what if” lasts until December?last_img read more

first_imgAll we do is win. 9-0. #GoPokes pic.twitter.com/z711XF7a0X— Kaid Kinzie (@KaidKinzie) November 8, 20153. James Washington has separated himself (KP)It’s coming at the right time, too. One of OSU’s “weaknesses” is that it didn’t have a guy you had to gameplan around on offense. Now? The WR depth actually starts to matter because of Washington’s sudden explosion. ISU, Baylor and OU have to try and take No. 28 out of the picture which means Marcell Ateman, Big Hands Sheperd and Jhajuan Seales can step in if he’s erased. That’s big.“He’s put together two tremendous games, back-to-back,” said offensive coordinator Mike Yurcich. “That’s the big thing is that he’s consistent. The thing is, if they double cover him, somebody else has single coverage and we said earlier in the week, we have to find the single coverage matchups and throw to the one-on-one. Our guys are going to win those a majority of the time. That’s where we have to go with the ball.”4. We don’t need a RB1 (KB)Coming into the year, I predicted Chris Carson would be a 1,000 yard feature back. Raymond Taylor, Chris Carson, Rennie Childs, and Jeff Carr have all showed flashes of talent that have convinced me they can be the starter, but the committee approach has been just as effective.Saturday, Ray Tay lead all rushers with 28 yards – followed by Mason Rudolph (26), Rennie Childs (14), and Chris Carson (11).If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.5. Oklahoma State looks like a playoff team (KP)I’m not sure it had happened all season (maybe against UTSA), but the team I watched on Saturday afternoon looked like a College Football Playoff team. I’m not sure if they’ll end up getting there, but at least we know that gear exists because we didn’t know it for sure up until this point. The real question is what didn’t we learn on Saturday when OSU lit up TCU in Boone’s house. Here are five things we definitely learned.1. The defensive depth is insane (KP)Ryan Simmons out. Jimmy Bean out. Kevin Peterson hobbled. Ashton Lampkin not right. And Oklahoma State had no issues holding one of the two or three most explosive offenses in the country in check to the tune of 1.7 points per drive.TCU came into today averaging 3.54 points per drive, 3rd in the country. Today they scored 1.7 points/drive, which would be 96th. #Spencer— Dave Hudson (@okc_dave) November 8, 2015AdChoices广告For OSU to have a great defensive line and linebackers is mind-blowing in and of itself for lifelong OSU fans. But to be deep, too? That’s a dream.2. The home crowd advantage is real (KB)I went to the game on Saturday, and it was by far the loudest game I’ve ever been to. The “9 and O! postgame chant was incredible, but that was just a small glimpse of the raucous environment from the game. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Oklahoma State came back from a seveteen point road deficit on Saturday night in Ames, and closed the game in true Cardiac Cowboy fashion.After trailing the entire game, Mason Rudolph pioneered a beautiful drive down the field, capped by a J.W. swing pass to Jeff Carr to take the lead.What a drive. #okstate has the lead in Ames. Just win, baby. https://t.co/mqNgRSkiAF— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguys) November 14, 2015After the Cowboys took the lead, the defense stepped up big, including a big fourth down stop and what turned out to be a game-clinching INT by safety Jordan Sterns.AdChoices广告You can keep 2011. You don’t get 2015 too. https://t.co/I7pVj9y0hS— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguys) November 14, 2015What a ball game!last_img read more

first_imgKyle Porter here. I did not write this. I want to make that clear because I don’t want to take any credit for something that’s so well-researched and thought out. I simply have a blog that a lot folks read and this came to me from a guy named Justin Brownlee (who is a Kansas State fan) and I wanted to get it out there. It’s absolutely tremendous and well worth your time. It explains why teams named “Oklahoma State” and many others don’t get to play for national titles. I hope you enjoy it.What is the juggernaut theory?Within college athletics, there exists laws that define and control reality. Some of them are widely known, whether it’s the power of TV markets and cable contracts, or the recruiting hotbeds of Texas, Florida, and California and how a program’s success can be directly tied to their success recruiting out of these states.Other laws are not as visible, but they are just as strong, and the public greatly misunderstands them or largely misses how critical their existence is. The first law to focus on within college football is what I like to call the juggernaut theory.At first glance, every college football fan can acknowledge the juggernaut theory to a degree. Almost no one accurately attributes how much control and influence it actually has.Simply stated, the juggernaut theory is the idea that the dozen or so most powerful programs in college football have an extraordinary advantage in the landscape of modern college football. More specifically, these juggernauts have such an incredible advantage over non-juggernauts in getting to, and winning, national championships, that it is almost impossible to win a national championship as a non-juggernaut.Once understood, the juggernaut theory reveals the answers to why your favorite school regularly seems to make it to a major bowl game or occasionally the national championship itself, if you’re a fan of a juggernaut. And it will most definitely provide provide an answer to why your favorite team never makes a major bowl game outside of winning their conference, and never makes it to a national championship, if your alma mater is not a juggernaut.First, let’s make a distinction. I am labeling the following as juggernauts, USC, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Michigan, Nebraska, Texas, Oklahoma, LSU, Tennessee,[1.Nebraska and Tennessee are both interesting in the fact that both have allowed their programs to slip. In the case of Nebraska, it was inevitable at some point after the scholarship limit. Lincoln could not be further from the primary and secondary recruiting hotbeds. With Tennessee, there’s not a good excuse, they have just fallen.] Alabama, Florida, Florida State, and Miami. I think an argument can be made that Oregon has cracked into this group in a unique way, being the lone school without an extensively rich tradition of great football. They have muscled in the old-fashioned way, extraordinarily large amounts of money.I will make a quick note about one school that many of you may be wondering about, Auburn. I don’t really know what to do with Auburn. They have the tradition, the national championship, the major bowl games…my hesitation is solely because I don’t know anyone outside of Auburn, AL that doesn’t think they cheated in an obvious, egregious way for their national championship. I’m sorry, Auburn fans, I truly have no bone to pick with you, but it’s hard to know where to accurately place you in this list, but I’m throwing you in. More on that later.Second, I want to be very clear on this point. The entire theory is useful while examining the only period in college sports that means anything, the modern day. I will save my full defense of this point for another time and another theory, but I have to be clear. When viewing college athletics, it is paramount to largely ignore accomplishments prior to this time and focus exclusively on what has happened after.Take for example, the accomplishments of the great John Wooden. I love Coach Wooden and he will always be a treasure, but it’s unhelpful anytime someone compares his dynasty to anything in modern day sports. First, he competed during a time when maybe 10 schools in the entire country devoted significant amounts of time and money to their athletic programs. Today, there are upwards of 70 schools across the country devoted enormous amounts of time and resources to building exceptional athletic programs.[1.When I say 70+, that’s just college football. College basketball might be well over 150.]  Second, youth sports was largely non-existent 30+ years ago compared to today.My generation is the first that grew up with youth leagues, facilities, fitness programs, coaching, etc. all not just within five miles of wherever you lived, but also, for the first time, affordable for the majority of Americans. These first two realities created an entirely different modern day athletic environment-competition is not just greater than it used to be, it completely blows it out of the water. Competition today is the internet and competition prior to the modern era is the pony express. The final enormous difference are modern era cable contracts, forever moving college sports to the forefront of American life and culture.What is the “modern era”, then? It’s entirely debatable, and the exact year it started is not a hill I will die on, but I land somewhere in the mid 90’s. The Southeastern Conference was created in 1992, the superior Big 12 in 19963.[1.I married an Arkansas grad, this is literally the biggest fight in my marriage.] I generally will split the difference and use the creation and debut of “the deuce”, ESPN 2, in 1993.There’s no doubt that this time in American culture marked an enormous shift. Before this date, college sports were primarily something you read about in your local newspaper the day after. After this date, and in ever-increasing measure each year, college sports became something that you witnessed live, watched talking heads discuss all throughout the week, and could go every hour of the day watching some sort of coverage if you so desired.A brief history of juggernautsBack to subject at hand-as we examine the juggernauts and what they have accomplished during the modern era, it is staggering. Again, this is an idea that many people would agree on some level maybe exists, but almost no one acknowledges how much power it has over college football. Let’s look at the facts. Here are the national champions every year of the Modern Era.1993: Florida State1994: Nebraska1995: Nebraska1996: Florida1997: Nebraska[1. Any comparison of Alabama to mid 90’s Nebraska is a joke. Nebraska won championships the old fashioned way, by winning all of their games. For some reason, Alabama loses and we all think they’re actually more impressive than before their hiccup…]1998: Kansas State Tennessee.[1. I hate you, Bob Stoops. You too, Sirr Parker.]1999: Florida State2000: Oklahoma2001: Miami2002: Ohio State2003: USC and LSU2004: USC2005: Texas2006: Florida2007: LSU2008: Florida2009: Alabama2010: Auburn2011: Alabama2012: Alabama2013: Florida State2014: Ohio StateTo recap, juggernauts don’t just win most of the time. They literally win all of the time. What gets even more interesting is who they beat in each of these national championship games. Let’s take a look.1993: Nebraska1994: Miami1995: Florida1996: Florida State1997: Tennessee1998: Florida State1999: Virginia Tech[1. Here we have it-the only non-juggernaut to play for a national championship. Let that sink in. Out of FORTY EIGHT teams, only one non-juggernaut got the opportunity to line up and play for a championship.]2000: Florida State2001: Nebraska2002: Miami2003: Oklahoma2004: Oklahoma2005: USC2006: Ohio State2007: Ohio State2008: Oklahoma2009: Texas2010: Oregon2011: LSU2012: Notre Dame2013: Auburn2014: OregonThis is even more compelling, and much more significant, than the fact that juggernauts won every single national championship in the modern era (which you could argue means they won every national championship ever…). In over 20 years, not only have juggernauts dominated the national championship scene, they’ve had an iron grip on finishing 2nd. What does this mean? It’s not just extremely difficult to win a national championship, it’s extremely difficult to even get in the game for a chance to win a national championship.How we Got HereAs we look at why juggernauts have dominated the winning and losing sides of the championship game, we have to start with the fact that juggernauts have been given an enormous benefit of the doubt when it comes to the rankings that place them in the top two to begin with.Let’s just start with some of the more notable offenses.Auburn (2004)While I’ve stated that I don’t really know what to do with Auburn, and have placed them at the very back of the juggernaut list, 2004 showed the country that there is a pecking order. And when it comes to rankings, the top juggernauts will always be at the top of the pecking order.When you think about a team going undefeated and winning the SEC! SEC! SEC! and not being ranked No. 1,[1.Only because it’s impossible to rank them higher.] it’s pretty shocking given the outlandish SEC bias we live in today. That bias didn’t necessarily exist back in 2004. But the main premise is this: Auburn was never going to get the benefit of the doubt when compared with two pure juggernauts, USC and Oklahoma. OU actually ended up getting demolished in this game, and many Auburn fans were left to wonder what if.Oklahoma State (2011)Oh, 2011…you terrible, terrible year. Let’s start with the RIDICULOUS notion that any wrongdoing was swept away because Alabama won the game in such a convincing manner over LSU, so clearly they deserved to be there, end of story. I am AMAZED at how often this logic enters the picture anytime a team snuck in over another team and ends up winning it all (see Ohio State 2014).It’s like the whole country hasn’t even thought that maybe…just maybe…when you give Nick Saban or Urban Meyer six weeks to prepare for one (or two) game(s), they could beat anybody (!!!) even if it’s not their best team ever and they didn’t deserve to be there in the first place. Back to the matter at hand. In 2011 logic and sound thinking disappeared from humanity. Alabama, who did not win their conference, and who did not even win its division within its conference, was given so many brownie points for losing to LSU…at home…after a bye week…that the entire country largely ignored the rest of their resume.In 2011, Alabama only beat three teams that even made a bowl game, compared to Oklahoma State’s 7-8 wins over bowl teams. Yes, you read that correctly. Alabama was given the world based almost entirely on a close loss at home to LSU after a bye week. Let me rephrase it another way, Alabama was ranked over Oklahoma State for SOMETHING THEY COULD NOT DO!!!!But they couldn’t do it so impressively…their failure was so mesmerizing to the eye test, that this inability to do something placed them over a team with a far better resume. But let’s cut to the chase and be clear. Alabama got their rematch because Alabama is Alabama. Oklahoma State did not, because they are Oklahoma State.Baylor and TCU (2014)I will be brief on this one. One-loss Baylor and TCU were left to the dust for one loss teams Oregon, Ohio State, and Alabama. The Big 12 teams were largely downgraded for not having a championship game, this completely ignores the fact that Big 12 teams play everyone in their conference.When you list out the 14 teams in the SEC or Big 10, you begin to see that it’s very possible to play half of your schedule or more against nothing. In 2012, Georgia fans were screaming that they should have a spot in the title game if they beat Alabama in the SEC championship game (which they almost did). A quick look back to Georgia’s 2012 season reveals that their schedule was farcical. They literally played seven teams that any top 10 team in the country would be favored by more than 20 against.It’s so obvious it could go without saying, but if 2014 was Texas and OU instead of Baylor and TCU, and Arizona State and Minnesota instead of Oregon and Ohio State, no one would mention the lack of a title game. In fact, they would probably point out how amazing it is that the Big 12 somehow produced 2 teams that made it through such a brutal schedule with only one loss.This is the power of the juggernaut theory.The juggernaut theory does not stop with the national championship. It has held an enormous amount of power over who makes major bowl games (Orange Bowl, Sugar Bowl, Fiesta Bowl, Rose Bowl-we’ll call them BCS games even though the BCS has not covered the entirety of the modern era). When you look at the four BCS bowl games, you have six guaranteed spots for conference winners. That leaves two at-large bids. This changed for the better in 2006 when the BCS separated its title game and created two additional at-large bids. When examining the the at large bids given out from 1993-2005, you find 25 schools that received the bids. 19 of them were juggernauts.Being a Kansas State alum, this was not news to me. While we were awarded one of the six at-large bids (KSU demolished Donovan McNabb’s Syracuse team in the 1997 Fiesta Bowl), the next 5 years were full of questions. Such outlandish questions that the 1999 season had a newly instated “Kansas State Rule” that declared any team finishing in the top four of the final BCS Standings would be awarded an automatic at-large bid, after the Cats’ unforeseen 4th quarter meltdown in the Big 12 championship saw their greatest chance at a national championship free-fall into the Alamo Bowl.The very next season was another at-large miss as another top five 11-1 K-State team fell to the Holiday Bowl. 2000 would yield another 11 win K-State team, this time resulting in the Cotton. After a 6-6 down year in 2001, the Cats were overlooked again in 2002, after winning 11 games playing one of the hardest schedules in the country. One of those 11 wins was a very convincing victory over Carson Palmer’s USC team, who happened to get the at-large nod over the Cats. Finally K-State returned to the Fiesta Bowl in 2003 after knocking off Oklahoma for the Big 12 championship.This is obviously a very well known part of the juggernaut theory. It’s not rocket science or news to anyone that traditional powers are going to picked over non-juggernauts. Yet this holds the secret as to why the juggernauts have a stranglehold on the national championship game.Why Juggernauts Always Get the NodThe first and most obvious reason juggernauts get the nod the enormous majority of the time is that people gravitate towards them. It’s human nature. You choose the known over the unknown, the longtime proven commodity over the upstart.The interesting part about the juggernaut theory today (College Football Playoff) compared with the BCS era is that the CFP might do the opposite of what everyone thought it would do. With the BCS, you at least had a portion of the rankings that were not subject to public opinion. With the CFP, it’s entirely based on the opinions of humans. Let’s look at the small sample size of results. 2014 yielded four juggernauts.There were two very qualified teams that just missed out (hint-they weren’t juggernauts). The early November rankings of 2015 were probably the most laughable of any. While Clemson, a non-juggernaut (albeit a Southeastern school with some tradition)[1. We should add here that Clemson is ranked #1 because of wins over juggernauts (Notre Dame and Florida State). If they would have beat a one loss Utah and a two loss Syracuse, they probably wouldn’t be there.] held down the top spot, the rest of the top four were juggernauts. The most glaring aspect of the three juggernauts is that two of them are ranked in the top 4 with a loss, while several non-juggernauts sit outside of the top four with no losses!Here’s why this happens every single year in college football. College football is the only major sport in America where the layout of teams is so fractured, we really cannot get a completely accurate picture of who the best teams definitely are. There are only 3-4 non-conference games, majority of which are puff opponents.Compare this to college basketball where non-conference play and the tournament give us a fairly reasonable picture of which teams and conferences were actually the strongest. All of the professional sports play enough games that fracturing doesn’t happen, we can again see who the best teams are. With college football, it’s a total toss-up. Take last year for example, there’s still a very active disease assumption in America that the SEC is significantly better than the rest of the country.There was also a strong belief that the Big 10 was slow and wouldn’t come within 3 touchdowns of Alabama. While both assumptions may have been perfectly accurate a few years before, the distinct separation of conferences kept that thought alive.Here is the stark truth: it is not possible to know exactly how much value to place on each conference in any given year. This makes it extremely difficult to pick just 2-4 teams to play in the national championship.In addition to literally having no way to discern exactly how teams and conferences stack up to each other, college football is littered every year with teams having the exact same record. Let me tell you a secret about college football. It’s ******* hard to go undefeated. It’s ridiculously hard. Did I mention that there are, at the very least, 70 programs across the country that all unleash enormous amounts of time and money to building great programs?Or the millions of 18 year olds that, for their entire life, have taken advantage of facilities, coaches, and opportunities that did not exist to 18 year olds 30 years ago? For a coach to get 18-22 year old kids to play at such a consistently high level 14 times a year is absurd. What am I getting at? It was absolutely not a guarantee that the college football season would yield two, and only two, undefeated teams each and every year. And it’s even less of a guarantee that such a thing would happen to four teams in the CFP.What this means is that several BCS decisions were made between teams with the exact same record. Without an accurate way to tell which team is more deserving, America resorted to picking the juggernaut, every single time.[1. …but then giving justification for it that sometimes sounded as ridiculous as Alabama looking really really good trying to do something they couldn’t do.]The answer is making the playoff extend another week and adding four more teams. Having four teams with five major conferences is nonsensical, and assuming only conference champions deserve to go is also wrong. With eight teams, juggernauts will still get picked a lot. But with eight, the playoff is ensuring that almost without fail, the best team in the country got a chance to play for a national championship. Last year, Ohio State was a deserving champion, but a perfectly reasonable case can be made that TCU was the best team in the country. With eight, this doesn’t happen.[1. Quick disclaimer — I don’t think juggernauts getting picked is necessarily bad all of the time. I am not saying that Oklahoma State definitely deserved to play LSU over Alabama (or Auburn USC or TCU/Baylor). It’s very possible the Big 12 provided tons of bowl teams for OkState to play that were all good, not great. I’m simply pointing out that college football has, and will, produce pretty even resumes and the juggernaut will get the nod almost every time.] While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgI’ve been thinking a lot this week about the differences between 2011 and 2015. The only two 10-0 teams in the 114-year history of Oklahoma State football. That 2011 team was like watching a painter paint his masterpiece in a soundproof glass box from 100 feet away. Breathtaking, but completely removed from reality. That team was, by the sports definition of the word, unreal.As OSU fans, we’d never considered, much less experienced, anything like it.This 2015 team is wildly different and yet, somehow, just as accomplished. The experience of rooting for them every Saturday is totally other from that 2011 experience thought. As if somebody shattered the soundproof glass box and told those of us watching that we had to help the artist paint his masterpiece in under three minutes by handing him every color he needs. Then doing that 12 weeks in a row.AdChoices广告Evan Epstein came back on our podcast on Thursday and confirmed what I had been considering.“We knew we were going win every game (in 2011) because we were just destroying people,” said Epstein on our podcast on Thursday. “(This team) knows they’re going to win every game because it doesn’t matter if they’re destroying people or not. They’re just going to win. That’s almost an even more advanced level of temperament. There’s cockiness and knowing how good your team is. Then there’s confidence and knowing how good your teamwork is. Those guys have the latter. It’s tough to beat a team like that.”It is really, really tough to beat a team like that.Sure, this team has been lucky. It has caught a lot of breaks. What teams don’t during dream seasons? That’s one of the things that has frustrated me about the College Football Playoff committee. It’s like they’re trying to readjust what should have happened in a college football season instead of what actually happened. There’s a reason going 12-0 is so dang hard and why teams that do it catch a bunch of breaks along the way.That 2011 team was more like an Alabama powerhouse than any of us were used to. This year’s team is 100 percent orange, through and through. I’ve written before why I prefer the latter (although I didn’t mind the former every once in a while) and I guess that gets at why OSU fans have been so euphoric about this year’s team.This team is a microcosm for all Oklahomans. Hard-working, gritty as hell and not excited to let you know about it. This team is all Oklahomans. It is not grandiose. It resonates and keeps coming back to resonate some more. We didn’t understand that 2011 team. It was like an alien. This one we get. This one is all of us in some way, bootstraps and all.And the best thing is that none of this was supposed to happen. OSU was 100-1 to win it all in August. It isn’t even a favorite to win this weekend against a suddenly-reeling Baylor team on its second (and maybe third) QB. That’s how we like it. That’s how it’s always been for OSU teams and fans. This team was what all OSU teams are supposed to be — a year away. A couple of players from being great. Maybe it was going to upset a few teams, have a little fun, but not this.The unexpectedness is what’s made it feel so grand. The games in 2011 were a relief. Actually, most of the time they were routs. That was fun. But it wasn’t this kind of fun. It wasn’t fun like this every Saturday.“They need to embrace this moment,” said Mike Gundy on Monday about his team. “All of us do. That’s one thing that I’ve been able to do this year. I really enjoy the team, and I think they’re maximizing who they are as individuals. As a team concept, we’re getting what we can get out of our football team. We put a lot of work in and buy into the system, and then you go home at night and go to sleep. It has been really fun for me.”It’s been a lot of fun for all of us. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. On a day for great profiles, ESPN’s Chris Low wrote a great one of Mason Rudolph. The thing in it that really stood out to me was how ambivalent schools were about his recruitment and how ambivalent he was in return about heading to Stillwater to play for Mike Gundy and Co.“Mason’s offers during his junior season were LSU and Virginia Tech,” his high school coach Kyle Richardson told ESPN. “We sent out film to everybody, too. I don’t know if he got tagged as a system quarterback as much as it was some people looking at it like it was easy to do what we do in our system because Justin also put up incredible numbers. But it’s not easy to just wake up and throw for 4,000 yards.”I liked that quote. And can’t you just see him sitting in the pocket for a revamped Tennessee or a reloaded Georgia and having his way? Thankfully, Tennessee and Georgia didn’t see things that way. So Rudolph headed west.“(Oklahoma State was) my third or fourth offer, right after my junior year,” he said. “I didn’t give it much thought and really sort of shrugged it off because I thought, ‘I’ll never go that far away to school.’ But the more I learned about Oklahoma State, the more I liked it. The offense was what I wanted. The quarterback depth chart offered the chance for early playing time, and then when I came out here and met everybody, I knew it’s where I belonged.”The allure of Stillwater.Rudolph has a chance to build upon that allure onSaturday night as he tries to add to his 12-1 record as OSU’s starter and beat the only Big 12 team he’s never beaten … 14 games into his college football career.Finally, this from Gundy was hilarious. This is literally the only kind of QB you’ve been around, Mike!“I didn’t know he was going to be so far along so early in his career,” Gundy said. “It’s on those rare occasions that players participate and play better in games than you thought they would because you’re usually going to get what you see in practice. He was OK in practice. But in games, he was a better player than we thought. I’ve not been around many guys like that where they played better earlier than we thought.”You should go read the whole thing.last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Oklahoma State’s coaches and players talk about the first loss of 2015.1. Mike Gundy on his team’s effort“I thought our guys fought. They never gave up. Their attitude was good, and they played with a lot of effort. We made some adjustments on defense and slowed them down a little bit, but we couldn’t effectively stop the run when we needed to. We also weren’t able to rush the ball and stay balanced. We’ve got to rally these guys, get them back tomorrow and start getting ready for the next game.”2. Mike Gundy on coming from behind“When we did get some stops on some turnovers, we didn’t take advantage of it on offense. Then we let the game spread out a little bit, and the catch-up routine was not a very good fit for us based on what we were trying to do in the game. We got behind, and we became one-dimensional. That wasn’t effective for our team. They were able to run the ball behind those big guys, and then they were able to throw down the field to those fast guys. When they’re hitting on that segment of their offense, they’re tough to deal with.”3. Glenn Spencer on Baylor“We couldn’t stop anything. They’re hard to stop and very good, and evidently, they’re a lot better team than us. When you get hit on a couple of deep balls, you find something to do there and then you leave something open somewhere else. They’re a balanced team and executed a lot better than us. They have good skill kids that can match up and beat you at any time.”4. Spencer on Baylor’s 303 rushing yards“There were a couple situations in the backfield that were really bad. They broke tackles and broke containment a couple of times. They were always falling. We’d hit them for a gain of two, and they’d fall for five. Whether we were stopping our feet or not getting an extra body to the ball, there were a lot of reasons we gave up so many.”5. Spencer being Spencer“It was a Greek tragedy. I’m a big boy though so I’ll take responsibility.”6. David Glidden, shooting straight“They’re a good team, and they made a lot more plays than we did today.”7. Glidden on Bedlam“Hopefully, we come out with a little more fire than we did this week. It’s Bedlam for a Big 12 championship so that should say enough.”8. Seth Jacobs on Baylor“You have to give them credit, they’re a really good team. What they do, they do really well. There were times when we didn’t execute and times when we didn’t make plays when we really needed to, but you have to give credit to them. They are a very talented team, and they came out here and played well.”[1. Good on our guys for giving them credit.]9. The General on his first loss of 2015“As far as a Big 12 contender, there’s nothing better you can ask for. Playing for the Big 12 title and having the chance to say you’re the top dog in a Power Five conference is great. I think we’ve done a really good job this year of showing that we are a real contender. Next week we’re going to be very fired up for the opportunity.”10. Art Briles on the W“It was a hard-fought game against a really good football team. I have so much respect for Oklahoma State. They’ve been behind in some games and have come back three or four times this year. They’re very composed and never panicked. They stay within their system, and I just think they’re an extremely well-coached football team. They’re a really tough team to beat. It’s an extremely tough place to win with the environment, but it’s also because they’re an extremely good football team. They’re always a good team.”11. DL Andrew Billings with some truth“[Oklahoma State] had a lot to lose. We knew they were going to come out and play hard, and we had to match that. We had to double their energy because we already had a loss. We had to throw that out and beat OSU.”last_img read more

first_imgThe Oklahoman is saying Mayfield should be good to go for Bedlam on Saturday and OU’s 247 site took it one step further.Per our sources, Baker Mayfield WILL play Saturday against Oklahoma State. #Sooners— OUInsider (@OU247) November 23, 2015I do hope he plays for multiple reasons. 1. He’s fun to watch. 2. I don’t want an OSU win to be written off. 3. I don’t want Trevor Knight to turn into Sugar Bowl Trevor for one game which would inevitably happen.UPDATE: From Stoops himself.Bob Stoops says Baker Mayfield has passed all concussion tests past two years. “If he continues this way … then he is expected to play.”— Adam Rittenberg (@ESPNRittenberg) November 23, 2015 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Trevor Knight played the second half against TCU on Saturday because Baker Mayfield may (or may not) have suffered a concussion.The Oklahoman said he passed concussion tests during the game as well as on Sunday even though OU chose it best to not play him.Despite Mayfield passing concussion tests he was given during the game and at halftime, OU coaches chose to play it safe and keep him off the field. These days, with head injuries and the long-term damage they can cause being at the forefront of everyone’s consciousness, it’s usually better to be safe than sorry.That’s a big boy decision at this point in the season with all systems (allegedly) go on the Baker.AdChoices广告Stoops has said in the past that he purposefully keeps a distance between himself and the concussion testing protocol to avoid any appearance that he is interfering, and he said as much again after Saturday’s game.“I’m not part of the whole testing situation and everything they do,” Stoops said. “I know our doctors are incredibly thorough and always err on the safe side.”last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Here’s a quick update to the CFP vs. 100+ computer polls I posted last week. Let’s see how the Committee stacks up this week.Screen Shot 2015-11-25 at 9.51.49 AMGreen means you are rated higher by the CFP committee than the computer polls. Red means you are rated lower. A few notes:Iowa remains at No. 8 in the computer polls, but their 40-20 win over 2-9 Purdue was enough to push them up a spot in the Committee’s rankings. They are now rated four spots higher than the computers rank them.Michigan State moved up four spots in both sets of rankings this week — CFP and computers. Still, they remain two spots higher in the CFP rankings than they do in the computer polls.Ohio State dropped from 3rd to 8th in the CFP rankings, but only dropped one spot in the computer polls. As a result, they are now 4 spots lower in the CFP poll than the computer polls.Northwestern gained respect in both sets of rankings this week, but the Committee remains enamored with them, as they have defeated three Committee members’ schools (Stanford, Nebraska, Wisconsin). I’m sure that doesn’t have anything to do with it, though.TCU dropped five spots in the computer polls this week, but the Committee only dropped them one spot after OU’s 1-point win in Norman. This seems like either a sign from the Committee that they got TCU wrong last week, or – more likely – shows the Committee’s newfound respect for OU.Washington State. I had to check to make sure I had this one right. The Committee was impressed enough with Wazzu’s win over Colorado that they moved them into the rankings at No. 20. Meanwhile, the computers have them 16 spots lower at No. 36.Temple’s win over Memphis propelled them to No. 25 in the CFP rankings, eight spots higher than the computers.Who got left out? LSU is 20th in the computer poll but unranked by the CFP Committee.Here’s how it looks by conference:Screen Shot 2015-11-25 at 9.52.45 AMThe Pac 12 looks way out of wack, but that is really just one team – Washington State. Outside of that anomaly,once again it’s the Big 10 that is favored by the Committee and the Big 12 that is frowned upon.Here’s how the conferences stack up according to the computer polls this week:Screen Shot 2015-11-25 at 9.53.03 AMlast_img read more

first_imgThe last week of the regular season. It’s been a blast this year, hasn’t it? Rivalry week abounds and really gets cranking on Friday night with TCU-Baylor. OSU badly needs a TCU win in that game to have a chance at the Big 12 title on Saturday night. Here’s this week’s schedule via Ryan Hartwig.Weekend Watch Guide: Week 13 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.AdChoices广告last_img read more

first_imgYou guys all know the story by now. Baker meets OSU soccer player. Baker falls in love with OSU soccer player. OSU soccer player roots for OSU in Bedlam. The whole thing is quite funny and great.And it turned out to be the source of some terrific College GameDay signs which Baillie Burmaster (Baker’s girlfriend) embraced with a smile. Well done all the way around.Screen Shot 2015-11-28 at 1.09.06 PM Screen Shot 2015-11-28 at 1.09.12 PM Screen Shot 2015-11-28 at 1.09.00 PMAdChoices广告When helping out @CollegeGameDay and you become the joke of @CollegeGameDay signs… pic.twitter.com/unlyi6xpvf— Baillie Burmaster (@bayburmTV) November 28, 2015 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgThings didn’t go as planned on Saturday night, but the Cowboys came out with a “punch ’em in the mouth” mentality. Devante Averette laid the wood on Alex Ross during a kick return, and CHUNKS of the helmet went flying after the big hit.That hit tho ?https://t.co/NRsd6u6DlL— Kyle Boone (@PFBoone) November 29, 2015 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.AdChoices广告last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Well, after much begging and a small monetary contribution to Kyle’s children’s college fund, I get to keep writing for PFB. I’m moving on from breaking down plays to breaking down recruiting film. On to today’s recruit, Mique Juarez. Juarez is an athletic OLB. He could potentially play the star position with his speed and size. The star position is basically a third safety. In the Big 12, defenses need as much speed on the field as possible. Jordan Burton was OSU’s star linebacker this year. Burton is 6’3 215, Juarez is listed at 6’2 215. AdChoices广告As you can see, Juarez is an athlete. His 40 time is listed in the 4.6 range. That’s solid for a linebacker. Juarez plays DE, LB, QB, and WR, he also had some kick return action in there. Juarez looks like a college athlete playing pee wee. He’s aggressive, mean and likes to head hunt. His combination of speed and power are too much for high school players to handle. Juarez also shows nice patience in waiting for the play to develop before attacking. That is something OSU needs badly. On Perine’s big touchdown run, OSU’s linebacker shot inside and there wasn’t anybody to the outside to contain the edge. Juarez also has the make up speed if he does step the wrong direction. His vision is probably his greatest strength, he sees the play, and he understands what the offense is trying to do. His experience at QB will pay off big time when it comes to defense. He does have some things to work on, he often times slings people to the ground. That works when you are considerably bigger and stronger than everyone. It won’t work against D1 level running backs. What skills he lacks in are coachable; you can’t coach speed, vision, and power.Strengths: Speed, field vision, power, explosiveness, and size for the position.Weakness:  Arm tackling, and getting by on athletic advantage instead of using good technique.Player he reminds me of: Eric Striker, they have similar size, athletic ability and explosiveness.Juarez would be a game changer for OSU’s defense. The linebackers are really good players, they just are missing someone who can take over a game, similar to how Striker took over Bedlam. OSU had no answer for his relentless attack. OSU has recruited well at DE, imagine having a good DE and putting blitzing Juarez on the same side. Likeliness of OSU getting him: I’d say 25 percent, it’ll be tough to fight through the California schools and OU. Hopefully he picks the good guys this winter.I’ll be back later on to break down some of our other big name recruits.  last_img read more

first_imgFormer running backs coach Jemal Singleton left Stillwater last year, but was well entrenched in Stillwater after being an assistant on staff for three years. He knows all about the culture in Stillwater.On Monday, he celebrated his 40th birthday, and some young gun poked the bear, which lead to this hilarious tweet:@The3rdRawleigh “I’m a man, I’m 40″— Jemal Singleton (@CoachSings) December 7, 2015Singleton is now the special teams coordinator and running backs coach at the University of Arkansas.AdChoices广告 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgESPN released the viewer statistics from the 2015 football season on Thursday, revealing that this season was the network’s most watched ever – over 1,961,000 average viwers per episode.Of the most watched episodes this season, the three-hour broadcast from Stillwater was the most watched, receiving 2,267,000 average viewers, the most ever for a College Gameday broadcast.During the broadcast, you probably saw Lee Corse pick the Cowboys and nearly blow Rickie Fowler’s head off:This was INSANE. Corso almost lost his head, nearly shot Fowler. pic.twitter.com/IG9amrcIFT— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguy) November 28, 2015AdChoices广告Of course we all know the outcome of the game… The Sooners rolled in Bedlam and earned the No. 4 seed in the college football playoff. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. AdChoices广告Trace Clark takes us through the Sugar Bowl gift suite packages which each player receives just for being on the team. The logic is strong, too. You start with the recliner and everything else is trying to knock that off.Also, I loved him saying, “I don’t know what mountains you’re finding in Stillwater, Oklahoma …”last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. The bane of Oklahoma State fans across the globe this year was the fact that OSU finished No. 114 in the country in yards per carry this year. That is comically bad. Of Power 5 schools, only Washington State, Missouri, Florida and Kansas were worse. Here are the bottom 15 teams in the country in yards per carry.Screen Shot 2016-01-11 at 2.28.27 PMThe ire of the head ball coach, however, is not directed where you might think. Fans (including myself) have long blamed the offensive line. And to be fair, it has not been pretty.This picture is going to get me kicked the hell out of this damn press box!! Give me a helmet that’s it!!! #WTF pic.twitter.com/ORHXy1gxAx— Sam Mayes (@AllmericanMayes) January 2, 2016AdChoices广告But Mike Gundy put the blame on his running backs as much as the guys blocking for him.“The other side of that is, we don’t have the explosive running back in our program like we had (in 2006-12),” Gundy told Go Pokes. “Tie those two things together, and it makes for a difficult running game.”That’s a pretty big indictment of Chris Carson and Co. but Gundy isn’t wrong.“If we don’t improve in the running game,we won’t win 10 games next year” Gundy told the Oklahoman. “We’ll improve on the offensive line with two things: experience and size. We need to find a guy to hand the ball to that can be more productive running the ball and not only get what we have blocked for them.Wow!“We managed to throw for 352 yards a game without rushing the ball,” he added to the Tulsa World. He also put forth some potential solutions.“There are two ways to (address) the issues we have,” Gundy told the Tulsa World. One is the way we’re doing it. The other way is to take a risk and go out and (sign) four or five junior college kids for a couple of years, like some schools do on their defensive line and offensive line. To try and get the quick fix. To me, that’s detrimental for Oklahoma State football. It’s not good for the long term. …“There’s really no reason to panic. We’ve admitted to where we were at. These are discussions we’ve had with the players and coaching staff. … We have a plan in place … and that plan already has started.I hope parts two, three and four of this plan pan out better than the first one.last_img read more